Skip to content

5 Top Tips for Success at A level Maths and Wider Reading

October 6, 2016

My school has a Specialist Tutor Program in the sixth form which is a weekly timetabled slot to broaden students’ experiences. It’s a fantastic idea and, as a sixth form tutor, I run one of the sessions each week. The one I ran last week was titled 5 Top Tips for Success at A level Maths and was, partly, based on a survey I carried out via twitter recently. (Just to give you a flavour of the broadness, my one this week was about passing your driving theory test.)

I’ve collated and refined the results from the survey along with the experiences of my faculty into a structured powerpoint presentation. It was used in an hour session with mostly year 12 students. I consciously included some interactive bits and tasks to do and a couple of different presentation style so it’s not all just listening to me talk. Here’s a link to the ppt and you’re welcome to use/adapt it as you wish. Thanks to all the people that answered the survey and I know a lot of you will be interested in seeing the results.

5-top-tips-overview

If you take a look, you’ll notice that the last part is a wider reading list, aimed at anyone that wants to broaden their maths understanding or general interest, perhaps with a view to mentioning it in UCAS personal statements. It is obviously non-exhaustive but here’s the list for ease of reference:

Books

Podcasts

On the internet

As I was buying a book for my son (Number Quest – more on this another time) I stumbled across an eBay shop that had lots of maths books for sale pretty cheaply. Now, they also had an offer on of “buy 40 books, get 50% off”, and, like a TV with a broken volume control, you can’t turn that down can you?

I picked out some for myself:

books-mine

Some that I’m going to take in for students to borrow:

And there was only a minor mishap as I tried to buy a couple of copies of Alex Bellos’s book, ‘Alex through the looking glass’:

books-alex

I don’t suppose anyone wants a snooker book do they?

Advertisements
One Comment

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Wrong, but Useful episode 37 | reflectivemaths's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: